Majority Systems

Candidates win seats by having a majority of votes in their district.

Examples of Majority Electoral Systems

Alternative Vote

How It Works:
There are 19 electoral districts, each of which elect only one candidate.

How You Vote:
You rank the candidates in your district by preference.

The candidate with a majority of votes wins.

What If There Is No Majority Winner:
If no candidate receives a majority of first-rank votes after the first round of voting, the candidate with the lowest number of first-rank votes is eliminated.

The second-rank votes from the eliminated candidate are allocated to the remaining candidates.

This continues until a candidate receives a majority of votes.

Things To Consider:
Electoral districts have direct, local representation - the candidates they vote for live in their district.

Candidates ultimately win a majority of votes; however, a candidate could win without the highest number of first-rank votes, meaning that candidates and parties may disproportionately represent the desires of their constituency.

Example:
After the first round of voting, Candidate A has 250 votes, Candidate B has 400 votes, and Candidate C has 350 votes.

Candidate A is eliminate and the second-rank votes are allocated to candidates B and C.

After the second round, Candidate B has 450 votes and Candidate C has 550 votes.

Candidate C wins with a majority of votes, but not a majority of first-rank votes.

Two-Round System

How It Works:
There are 19 electoral districts, each of which elect only one candidate.

How You Vote:
You vote for a single candidate in your district.

The candidate with a majority of votes wins.

What If There Is No Majority Winner:
If no candidate receives a majority of votes after the first round of voting, the top two candidates participate in a run-off election where the winner receives the majority of votes.

Things To Consider:
Electoral districts have direct, local representation - the candidates they vote for live in their district.

Candidates ultimately win a majority of votes, and even though a candidate may be a voter's second choice, having a run-off election (as opposed to a ranked ballot) means that a candidate cannot win without directly receiving a majority of votes.

Want to learn more?

There are many other options for electoral systems.

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For more information on Plurality Electoral Systems, and electoral reform in general, you can:

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