Mixed Electoral Systems

A portion of seats are awarded according to one electoral system (ie. plurality/majority), while another portion are awarded according to another (ie. proportional).

Examples of Mixed Electoral Systems

Parallel Vote

How It Works:
There are 19 electoral districts, each of which elect only one candidate.

There is an additional electoral district in which multiple additional candidates are elected.

How You Vote:
You vote for a single candidate in your district. You cast a second vote for your preferred party, or in some cases an additional candidate.

The candidate with the highest number (or possibly a majority) of votes wins their specific district.

Political parties are awarded a proportion of additional seats based on the proportion of votes they received in the secondary ballot.

Things To Consider:
In order to accommodate a blend of local constituency and proportional representation, this system would likely require the addition of seats to the legislature.

Example:
The current 19 seats would remain to be filled by a plurality/majority system, and an additional 11 seats would be added to accommodate seats assigned by proportional representation.

Mixed Member Proportional

How It Works:
There are 19 electoral districts, each of which elect only one candidate.

There is an additional electoral district in which multiple additional candidates are elected.

How You Vote:
You vote for a single candidate in your district.

The candidate with the highest number (or possibly a majority) of votes wins their specific district.

Political parties are awarded a proportion of additional seats based on the proportion of votes they received.

Things To Consider:
As the proportional representation seats are determined by the same votes as the plurality/majority seats, this system inherently compensates for any over- or under-representation of parties compared to their share of the vote.

In order to accommodate a blend of local constituency and proportional representation, this system would likely require the addition of seats to the legislature.

Example:
The current 19 seats would remain to be filled by a plurality/majority system, and an additional 11 seats would be added to accommodate seats assigned by proportional representation.

Want to learn more?

There are many other options for electoral systems.

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For more information on Plurality Electoral Systems, and electoral reform in general, you can:

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